Tag Archives: social care

Robert's Story

Sleep-in shifts judgement is an affront to the dignity of care workers

Belsize Village, London, UK: Following the London Court of Appeal’s judgement in favour of Mencap in Royal Mencap Society v Tomlinson-Blake, overturning a previous ruling at the Employment Appeals Tribunal in April 2017, Penrose Care’s managing director Robert Stephenson-Padron, a long-time advocate for the ethical treatment of home care workers, made the following statement:

“The London Court of Appeal’s decision today in Royal Mencap Society v Tomlinson-Blake is a horrific miscarriage of justice and an affront to the dignity of the human person.

I would 100% endorse UNISON taking the case to the Supreme Court. The last time UNISON went to the Supreme Court in R (on the application of UNISON) v Lord Chancellor in July 2017, they won and changed Britain for the better. I expect if UNISON took Royal Mencap Society v Tomlinson-Blake to the Supreme Court, this would result in a repeat of their prior triumph for justice for ordinary working people.

Penrose Care will continue to abide by the most obvious interpretation of the law which is to pay at least the national minimum-wage / national live wage for sleep-ins even if certain of our peers en mass decide to continue exploiting and abusing Britain’s vital social care workforce. This is the morally right thing to do. Penrose Care has been paying at least the minimum wage for sleep-in shifts since we commenced trading in 2013 as the law was clear then and it remains clear.”

Media Contact

Robert Stephenson-Padron – Managing Director – 020 7435 2644

About Penrose Care

Penrose Care is an ethical provider of home care services London, United Kingdom to adults with disabilities and elderly persons, including those with dementia.  The company operates upon a fundamental belief that to promote a caring workforce, the organisation itself must be caring. As the pioneer of ethics in home care in the UK, Penrose Care in 2012 became one of the first four providers in the country to become an Accredited Living Wage Employer and in 2013 the first independent sector provider to be compliant with Citizens UK’s landmark Social Care Charter. Penrose Care was named the Living Wage Champion for the London region in 2016 by the Living Wage Foundation.

Penrose Care’s ethical approach promotes higher quality social care workers and low staff turnover which in turn results in excellent care. Penrose Care is headquartered in Belsize Village, north London and was founded by Robert Stephenson-Padron, a healthcare research analyst, and Dr. Matthew Knight, a hospital physician.

Penrose Care managing director Robert Stephenson-Padron speaks at Camden Council about Brexit. Photo 5

Penrose Care head speaks out on Brexit at Camden Council

Belsize Village, London, UK: Yesterday on the night of October 23, 2017, Penrose Care’s managing director Robert Stephenson-Padron spoke to a meeting of Camden Council at Camden Town Hall on Judd Street about the impacts of Brexit on home care.

The extraordinary meeting which invited various speakers from across the Borough was organised by the Camden Council Brexit Working Group led by Cllr. Lazzaro Pietragnoli.

A copy of of Mr. Stephenson-Padron’s prepared remarks are beneath the contact information of this press release.

ENDS

Media Contact

Penrose Care

Robert Stephenson-Padron

robert.padron@penrosecare.co.uk

0207 435 2644

About Penrose Care

Penrose Care is an ethical provider of home care services London, United Kingdom to adults with disabilities and elderly persons, including those with dementia.  The company operates upon a fundamental belief that to promote a caring workforce, the organisation itself must be caring. As the pioneer of ethics in home care in the UK, Penrose Care in 2012 became one of the first four providers in the country to become an Accredited Living Wage Employer and in 2013 the first independent sector provider to be compliant with Citizens UK’s landmark Social Care Charter. Penrose Care was named the Living Wage Champion for the London region in 2016 by the Living Wage Foundation.

Penrose Care’s ethical approach promotes higher quality social care workers and low staff turnover which in turn results in excellent care. Penrose Care is headquartered in Belsize Village, north London and was founded by Robert Stephenson-Padron, a healthcare research analyst, and Dr. Matthew Knight, a hospital physician.

Robert Stephenson-Padron’s prepared remarks for Camden Council’s extraordinary meeting on Brexit held on October 23, 2017:

Mr. Mayor and councillors, thank you for inviting me to speak to you tonight about the European Union and Brexit. I would like to say a special hello and thank you to Councillor Lazaro, who was actually the person who swore me in as a British citizen in 2014 in this chamber three years ago.

Indeed, I speak to you as an immigrant and on behalf of Penrose Care, an ethical home care provider based in Belsize Village which largely consist of immigrants. 80% of our staff are EU nationals.

As such, the rhetoric and uncertainty running up to and post last summer’s EU referendum has put undue stress on my colleagues and has presented Penrose Care and the entire social care sector with a variety of significant challenges which further imperil an already fragile sector.

Before I speak to those challenges I want to make clear the monumental importance the European Union has had on my life and indeed, the life of Penrose Care.

First, would I have moved here to the UK if it had not been a member of the EU in 2007. Probably not.

Further, if you asked me today, do I think we would have established Penrose Care in 2012 if the UK was not a member of the European Union? I would say, probably not, particularly since our first workers were all EU nationals.

And therefore along with looking at the specific impacts of Brexit on social care, the Council should consider the long-term impacts of Brexit on entrepreneurship, capital formation, and SME-led job creation.

Now looking at social care, as you know, it is important to recognise that it is a sector whose crises preceded the Brexit vote but have been worsened by the Brexit vote. These include:

1) A worsening in the social care recruitment crisis. The long-term recruitment crisis in social care shifted to a catastrophe after the Brexit vote, with EU nationals here less keen to move jobs and new EU nationals being deterred from moving here.[1]

2) And this has led to a worsening in the delayed transfer of care crisis. This has been the most catastrophic crisis worsened by the Brexit vote with English delayed transfers of care beds due to social care delays increasing by 38%[2] last winter year-on-year with patients being unable to secure social care amid a recruitment crisis worsened by Brexit.

3) The nursing shortage crisis. We have 24,000 nursing vacancies and nursing registrations from the EU have fallen by 96%.[3],[4] This worsens the quality of services district and community nursing can provide, negatively impacting our collaborations with them.

4) The social care financial crisis. One in four home care providers are at risk of insolvency according to BBC Panorama in March.[5] This crisis is exacerbated if care providers cannot maintain staffing levels and cannot grow if they cannot increase their staffing levels.

I would be happy to elaborate on these challenges to you in the Q&A but I would close by saying that of course the UK has every right to leave the EU. But I think none of us have the right to sit idly by while this reckless Brexit process inhibits our ability to support the most frail in our society in safe and dignified ways.

Thank you.

[1] “Social care system ‘beginning to collapse’ as 900 carers quit every day” (BBC News: 11 April 2017), available http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-39507859

[2] Delayed Transfers of Care Data 2017-18 (NHS England, 12 Oct 2017), available https://www.england.nhs.uk/statistics/statistical-work-areas/delayed-transfers-of-care/delayed-transfers-of-care-data-2017-18/

[3] “NHS faces shortage of more than 40,000 nurses after Brexit, says leaked government prediction” (Independent: 7 April 2017), available http://www.independent.co.uk/news/health/nhs-nurse-shortage-40000-post-brexit-trusts-hospitals-uk-healthcare-leaked-government-a7671791.html

[4] “96% drop in EU nurses registering to work in Britain since Brexit vote” (The Guardian: 12 June 2017)

[5] “’Lack of money’ prompts care firms to end council contracts” (BBC News: 20 March 2017), available http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-39321579

Penrose Care managing director Robert Stephenson-Padron speaks at Camden Council about Brexit. Photo 3

Penrose Care managing director Robert Stephenson-Padron speaks at Camden Council about Brexit. Photo 3

Penrose Care managing director Robert Stephenson-Padron speaks at Camden Council about Brexit. Photo 4

Penrose Care managing director Robert Stephenson-Padron speaks at Camden Council about Brexit. Photo 4

Penrose Care managing director Robert Stephenson-Padron speaks at Camden Council about Brexit. Photo 5

Penrose Care managing director Robert Stephenson-Padron speaks at Camden Council about Brexit. Photo 5

Penrose Care managing director Robert Stephenson-Padron at Camden Council - praised by a colleague on Instagram.

Penrose Care managing director Robert Stephenson-Padron at Camden Council – praised by a colleague on Instagram.

 

 

2017-07-04 (Penrose Care) Founding of Penrose Care

Five years on, thank you Dr. Knight

July 4, 2017 marks the birthday of the Penrose Care group of companies. And on this fifth anniversary of Penrose Care’s founding, our co-founder Robert Stephenson-Padron wrote an open thank you letter to our other co-founder, Dr. Matthew Knight.

Dear Dr. Knight,

The Fourth of July not only marks the birthday of my country of birth, the great United States of America, but also another thing very close to my heart: Penrose Ltd, the company you and I founded five years ago on July 4, 2012. Penrose Ltd is the holding company of Penrose Care Ltd, the social care organisation you and I created that is the UK’s pioneer of ethics in home care.

What was it that we did? What did we do that has attracted especially talented people who have vocations to care for the vulnerable in our otherwise “throw away” society? What did we do that has ensured that this group of special people deliver excellent care and support to the elderly and disabled day in and day out since Penrose Care commenced trading in the fall of 2013? What did we do that has caused a small home care provider in north London to attract the attention of health and social care professionals from across the globe?

This is what we did: in a West that has thrown out its roots in the unbridled pursuit of greed, we built a caring organisation that says both in words and in actions to our workers and to those we serve: you have dignity as a human being and this must be respected. This is a guiding truth that surpasses all other inclinations and endeavours. This is what we meant in our founding motto: “home care with a human touch.”

To our workers this recognition of their dignity as human beings first and foremost meant abhorring the idea that workers are a commodity that can be managed via a spreadsheet.

“Labour” is not a production input that you source as cheaply as possible and stack in a warehouse and pull out only when needed.

“Labour” is the sweat and effort of human beings, born from a mother and a father like you and I, who deserve a fair days pay for a fair days work. Penrose Care translated this by becoming one of the first Accredited Living Wage Employers in 2012 amid a social care sector known for poverty wages and sadly, continues to be known for poor working conditions generally. We however, have not and will not be pulled down into the dirty ways of our sector.

“Labour” is the precious time of human beings which must be respected. Penrose Care has translated this by guaranteeing a minimum number of working hours in its contracts the norm amid a social care sector where zero-hour contracts are standard. Although this decision specifically means we cannot grow as quickly as our peers who use people as “just-in-time inventory,” we believe our method builds a more sustainable, resilient and moral organisation. This commitment was enshrined in Citizens UK’s landmark Social Care Charter which also included rolling out an occupational sickpay scheme, something virtually non-existent in home care, to ensure workers do not feel obligated to go to work when ill. To this day, we are as far as we know the only private sector home care provider in the UK to comply with that charter of goodwill.

To our clients, the elderly and disabled, recognition of their dignity as human beings means putting them at the centre of all that we do to ensure the services we provide them are consistently outstanding. It means providing small and consistent teams to help them build trust and to respect their privacy – hence the fundamental necessity of our ethical workplace practices to attract caring people and retain them. It means sending staff who are confident and well-trained so we can help alleviate the stresses of our clients’ daily lives, not add to them. It means knowing those we serve, which is why we comprehensively assess the needs of those we serve and do not provide care visits of less than 1 and a 1/2 hours. It means we recognise the innate value of those we serve even if they are no longer “economically productive”.

As you and I said at the beginning of the Penrose story: to promote a caring workforce the organisation itself must be caring. Over the past five years, we have proven this to be true. And how could it not be true? As you and I simply, although arduously, are providing a living demonstration of the immemorial truth of our species: that every human being is precious. Because they are here, with us, in one human family. And we want to be with our workers, we want to help them live well and to grow. With our clients: we want to be with them.

The honours we have received for our good work in Penrose Care, at home and abroad, have been moving. They have been symbols of a “job well done.” And although we should be proud of our work, I know that you and I will maintain our humility. As you and I both know that we are only doing what we feel is our duty and our obligation to stand up to a culture and a system which is doing wrong, and to fight as hard as we possibly can to do what we know in our hearts to be right.

For the ultimate due, gratitude and praise goes to “The God of Love, The King of Peace,” who in a mysterious way we do not understand inspires us in our mission and in our fight.

My dear Dr. Knight, you and your lovely Spanish wife Elena have become part of my family in my home away from home, the United Kingdom. I am grateful for your friendship and for your collegiality.

We still have much work to do in the years ahead but I am confident we can do it. As Cesar Chavez, the leader of the union movement for which my grandfather belonged to back in California, used to say: “Sí se puede,” Spanish for, “It can be done.”

Thank you.

Yours always,

Bob

Robert “Bob” Stephenson-Padron is the managing director and co-founder of Penrose Care.

2017-07-04 (Penrose Care) Founding of Penrose Care

After months of planning, the firm decision to found Penrose Care happened on June 4, 2012 following a meeting Dr. Matthew Knight and Robert Stephenson-Padron had at the eminent hospital the Clinica Universidad de Navarra in Pamplona, Spain. One month later, Penrose Care was founded.

2017-07-04 (Penrose Care) Media recognition

Over the past five years, Penrose Care’s innovative ethical approach to home care has resulted in the company appearing in numerous mainline media outlet broadcasts.

2017-07-04 (Penrose Care) International recognition

Penrose Care’s approach to delivering consistently excellent care is so unique that research delegations have been sent from abroad to learn from us.

2017-07-04 (Penrose Care) Leadership recognition

Since Penrose Care’s founding, our managing director Robert Stephenson-Padron has twice been named the Most Outstanding Leader in the UK Care Sector.

2016-10-31-penrose-care-living-wage-champion-05-olga-and-bob

In 2016, Penrose Care was chosen out of over 1,000 Accredited Living Wage Employers in the London area to be the Living Wage Champion. To put this into context, in another UK region, IKEA won this honour.

 

Penrose Care managing director Robert Stephenson-Padron addresses leaders of the UK health and social care sector at the UK Over 50s Housing Awards on March 20, 2017.

Penrose Care head named top UK leader in care, award

Belsize Village, London, UK: Penrose Care is honoured to announce that its managing director, Robert Stephenson-Padron, was adjudicated as “The Most Outstanding Leader in the Care Sector in the UK” at the 2016 UK Over 50s Housing Awards ceremony held at the Millennium Gloucester Hotel, London on March 20, 2017. The ceremony recognises excellence in the health and social care industry across the United Kingdom.

On the occasion of receiving the award, Robert Stephenson-Padron addressed the combined conference and ceremony attendees which included Gary Hartland of St Philips Care Group of Wolverhampton and Charles Skene, chairman of Skene Group which owns the Inchmarlo Retirement Village in Royal Deeside, Scotland:

“I am honoured to receive this prestigious award, which I also received in 2014. Sadly, I must admit that I am far more pessimistic with respect to the outlook of health and social care in the UK than I was just a few years ago. Although courageous and innovative providers like Penrose Care can provide good jobs to our workforce while providing excellent care day in and day out, this is in the context of a wider sector that is doing neither nor does it appear to have the willpower nor the ability to reform in any material way to manage the daunting challenges associated with an ageing society.

The dismal health and social care backdrop is further exacerbated by a policy environment which is incoherent. We want to attract locals to work in social care but the public sector does not sufficiently fund the sector to pay even the national minimum wage in many cases. Nor does it sufficiently enforce national minimum wage laws when the sector fails to meet this basic law of decency which engenders a culture of impunity in a sector that should have a culture of responsibility [1]. Further, the sector has difficulties in building a healthy private segment to subsidise ailing public finances because the public sector actively permits and at times promotes unregulated providers, abusive use of unmeasured work contracts; and fails to crack down on the misclassification of employees which undermines honest companies like Penrose Care.

We want a skilled social care workforce and lean providers but we have been handed down from the government a care worker training system which is low on usefulness and high on paperwork. And that is assuming we can find workers to train. We have a sector with a severe staffing shortage – where roughly 80% of new recruits come from the EU – but we have a government which goes out of its way to make EU nationals feel uncomfortable here in the UK [2] [3]. We have a sector where BBC Panorama reported this morning that one in four home care providers in England are at risk of insolvency [4], but we have a regulator which just agreed to put up its fees to home care providers in England by 60% year-on-year [5]. The crisis in health and social care reflects a public leadership – and this is a cross-party failing – which lacks vision, and as the Bible tells us, ‘Where there is no vision, the people perish.’ [6] People are literally perishing due to the lack of vision among our public leadership as we read in the papers these days of people dying in hospital corridors. [7]

Failing to properly care for the elderly and infirm in our society is immoral. And if our public leaders will not stand up and make the reforms and improvements needed to address this national injustice, we the leaders of the health and social care sector with good will must stand up and inform civil society of the horrors being committed in a failing health and social care sector. We the leaders of Britain’s health and social care sector must work with British civil society so that the conviction that many of us hold dear – that all life is precious – is better reflected in British society going forward.”

Following granting the award to Mr. Stephenson-Padron, Esmonde Crawley, worldwide expert on care for the over 50’s and master of ceremonies of the UK Over 50s Housing Awards stated: “There is a dearth of good leaders who can lead the care industry in this country and it’s welcoming to see a rare beast indeed in Penrose [Care] and it’s wonderful to think that someone has the courage and the gnast to speak up when so many remain silent during these difficult times.”

At the awards ceremony, Mr. Crawley noted that this year at the UK Over 50s Housing Awards only 8 awards were given compared to 24 last year, reflecting the declining nature of good leadership in the health and social care industry in the UK.

ENDS

Media Contact

Penrose Care

Robert Stephenson-Padron

robert.padron@penrosecare.co.uk

0207 435 2644

UK Over 50s Housing Awards

Ann Richards

Suite 212, 28 Old Brompton Road

South Kensington

London SW7 3SS

0207 681 2020

Notes

[1] “Tens of thousands of care workers ‘still paid below minimum wage despite new regulations’” (Independent: 23 March 2016), available here.

[2] “Most European migrant care staff at risk of losing right to remain” (Community Care: 21 September 2016), available here.

[3] “U.K. lawmakers reject bid to guarantee rights of EU citizens” (USA Today: 14 March 2017), available here.

[4] “’Lack of money’ prompts care firms to end council contracts” (BBC News: 20 March 2017), available here.

[5] Changes in regulatory fees for providers confirmed (CQC: 10 March 2017), available here.

[6] Proverbs 29: 18 (BibleGateway: accessed 21 March 2017), available here.

[7] “Three patients die at Worcestershire hospital amid NHS winter crisis” (The Guardian: 06 January 2017) here.

About the UK Over 50s Housing Awards

The UK Over 50s Housing Awards have been created to celebrate and reward the best individual and company performances in the over-50s housing sector in the UK. The Awards recognise the rapid growth of the over-50s housing sector in the UK, and the capacity of individuals to influence and set new performance standards across the UK. The Awards focus on elevated performance; the creation of new business models; contrarian thinking; recognising and embracing new trends; market leadership; inspirational performance and the elevation of the customer experience. The awards have been running since 2009.

About Robert Stephenson-Padron

Robert Stephenson-Padron, aged 32, is a healthcare industry expert and former public servant. Prior to starting Penrose Care in 2012 with Dr. Matthew Knight, he was a healthcare research analyst at Merrill Lynch (2010-12), which he joined from Barclays Capital/Barclays PLC (2007-10). From 2003-2006, he served as a commissioner of the City of Berkeley, California, USA. Mr. Padron holds a BA in Economics from UC Berkeley and a Master in Economics & Finance from the Universidad de Navarra. Mr. Padron also holds a QCF Level 5 Diploma in Leadership for Health and Social Care and Children and Young People’s Services (Adults’ Management) (England) From Edexcel and a Higher Level Apprenticeship in General Adult Social Care from the Federation for Industry Sector Skills & Standards. Mr. Padron, growing up jointly in Gonzales, California and the northern cities of San Luis Obispo County, California, attended Gonzales High School and Templeton High School.

About Penrose Care

Penrose Care is an ethical provider of home care services London, United Kingdom to adults with disabilities and elderly persons, including those with dementia.  The company operates upon a fundamental belief that to promote a caring workforce, the organisation itself must be caring. As the pioneer of ethics in home care in the UK, Penrose Care in 2012 became one of the first four providers in the country to become an Accredited Living Wage Employer and in 2013 the first independent sector provider to be compliant with Citizens UK’s landmark Social Care Charter. Penrose Care was named the Living Wage Champion for the London region in 2016 by the Living Wage Foundation.

Penrose Care’s ethical approach promotes higher quality social care workers and low staff turnover which in turn results in excellent care. Penrose Care is headquartered in Belsize Village, north London and was founded by Robert Stephenson-Padron, a healthcare research analyst, and Dr. Matthew Knight, a hospital physician.

Esmonde Crawley, worldwide care expert, with Robert Stephenson-Padron after naming him "The Most Outstanding Leader in the Care Sector in the UK".

Esmonde Crawley, worldwide care expert, with Robert Stephenson-Padron after naming him “The Most Outstanding Leader in the Care Sector in the UK”.

Penrose Care managing director Robert Stephenson-Padron addresses leaders of the UK health and social care sector at the UK Over 50s Housing Awards on March 20, 2017.

Penrose Care managing director Robert Stephenson-Padron addresses leaders of the UK health and social care sector at the UK Over 50s Housing Awards on March 20, 2017.

Brexit would be dire for social care

Brexit would be dire for social care. Social care is experiencing an unprecedented recruitment crisis as well as many other challenges. (1) Expelling EU nationals currently working in social care and making it even more difficult to fill post going forward could turn a crisis situation into complete turmoil. Voters should recognise that even if Britain had no material funding issues in health and social care, these services cannot be provided without people willing to serve.

The challenges we face from ageing societies are pan-European and therefore we need more Europe-wide coordination in health and social care, not less. (2)

My professional aspiration for the EU would be to see a Europe-wide criminal check system to improve safety, standardised training across adult social care and health care assistants so we can more readily recruit from other EU countries and improve competence, and clearer guidance with respect to paperwork so we can better balance front-line care with compliance.

Further, we in the UK should use the EU to adopt best practice from other EU member countries. What can the UK learn from Estonia’s incredible e-health and data sharing innovations? What can the UK learn from innovative home care training schemes in the south of France? What can the UK learn from Germany successfully turning around failing state hospitals?

A great personal benefit of being a social care professional is you learn to listen to people, identify their needs and sources of suffering or discomfort, and try your best to address them. You are forced to reach out to people with a “I am here to help” rather than close them off and say, “not my problem”. For those who feel we may have some “unwanted migration” into the UK, open migration within the EU gives us the impetus to find out why people in our near abroad are leaving their native country. What can we do to help? Their challenges and suffering become ours. We begin to share hopes and aspirations – the building blocks to a better and more peaceful world.

Conversely, if my neighbour’s house across the street is on fire and I do nothing to help put it out (by calling the fire brigade) because they live across the street, should I be surprised if tomorrow my neighbour and their family come knocking on my door the next day asking for help?

Basic human decency and responsibility needs to also inform our interactions with other countries and our membership in the EU provides a call to do this. We knew this call not too long ago – we need to relearn it.

In 1946, in the aftermath of WWII, British Prime Minister Winston Churchill called for the building of a “kind of United States of Europe” to “re-create the European family” as the only way to guarantee peace. (3) French statesmen Robert Schuman and Jean Monnet made Prime Minister Churchill’s aspiration a reality on May 9, 1950 with the Schuman Plan, today known as the birth of the European Union ahead of its formal founding in 1957. (4) Since 1950, Europe has gradually integrated, experiencing an unprecedented period of peace and economic prosperity. (5)

As Prime Minister Churchill predicted, wars between EU member states have been averted, and indeed, as time has passed, thanks to the European Union, Europe has become more whole, (6) which has greatly benefited the social care sector workforce in the UK. (7) This wholeness makes us the UK and we the EU as a whole better able to tackle any challenge, whether it be our ageing crisis or the migrant crisis.

We need to stand in solidarity with our European brothers and sisters with all our problems and challenges. We need to work together to address them. The UK should remain part of and engaged in the European Union.

Robert Stephenson-Padron is the managing director of London-based home care provider Penrose Care that supports the elderly and disabled with social care needs in their own homes. Mr. Stephenson-Padron was named “The Most Outstanding Leader in the Care Sector in the UK” in the 2014 UK Housing Over 50s Housing Awards.

(1) Qwen, Jonathan. “Migrant workers needed to solve UK’s ‘crippling’ shortage of care workers, report says.” (Independent, 17 Nov 2015), available here.

(2)  Kassam, Ashifa et al. “Europe needs many more babies to avert a population disaster.” (Guardian, 23 Aug 2015), available here.

(3) Winston Churchill: calling for a United
States of Europe (European Commission, Oct 2015), available here.

(4) Robert Schuman: the architect of the European integration project (European Commission, Oct 2015), available here.

(5) Dinan, Desmond. Fifty Years of European Integration: A Remarkable Achievement (Fordham International Law Journal, 2007) v31(50: pgs 1118-1142, available here.

(6) Enlargement: Extending European values and standards to more countries (European Commission, June 2015) available here.

(7) Franklin Ben and Cesira Urzi Brancati. Moved to care: The impact of migration on the adult social care workforce. (Independent Age & International Longevity Centre UK, Nov 2015), pg 4, available here.

Penrose Care backs call for National Health and Social Care Commission

Belsize Village, Hampstead, London, UK: Yesterday at the Houses of Parliament, Penrose Care’s managing director, Robert Stephenson-Padron, backed Independent Age, the older people’s charity, and former Care Minister Norman Lamb MP’s (Liberal Democrat) call for the establishment of an independent, cross-party Commission into the future of health and social care [1].

Mr. Stephenson-Padron was also joined by former Health Minister Stephen Dorrell (Conservative) and former Shadow Care Minister Liz Kendall MP (Labour). Independent Age’s associated campaign is called “Care for Tomorrow”.

Penrose Care managing director, Robert Stephenson-Padron, said:

“As the pioneer of ethical home care in the UK, Penrose Care often sees the great benefits of excellent health and social care as well as the terrible outcomes from mediocre to bad care. Instances of excellent health and social care need to become the norm, and we as a society need to figure out how to make that the norm now, as our ageing populations will only make existing challenges more daunting as time passes. Penrose Care commends Independent Age and Norman Lamb’s call for an independent cross-party Commission into the future of health and social care and we would be happy to assist the commission in its inquiries post its creation.”

Independent Age’s “Care for Tomorrow” campaign calling for the Commission follows new ComRes polling [2] that found:

  • Four-fifths of British adults (81%) are concerned about the impact of an ageing population on the NHS and care services in Britain,
  • Half of British adults think the level of service in the NHS (51%) and care services for the elderly and disabled (47%) have worsened over the past 12 months,
  • Nearly two-thirds of Britons are not confident that the UK Government will ensure high standards in the NHS (61%) and care for elderly and disabled people (64%) in the future,
  • More than four-fifths of British adults (86%) agree that people with direct experience of health and care services (like patients, doctors, elderly and disabled people) should be involved in deciding the future of these services.

The bill that would establish the commission, the National Health and Social Care (Commission) Bill, will have its second reading in the House of Commons this Friday, 11 March 2016. [3]

[1] Norman Lamb calls for cross-party commission on NHS and social care (normanlamb.org.uk: 06 Jan 2016), available online: http://www.normanlamb.org.uk/cross_party_commission_nhs_and_social_care

[2] Public support cross party action to fix health and social care (Independent Age: 08 March 2016), available online: http://www.independentage.org/news-media/latest-releases/2016-press-releases/public-support-cross-party-action-to-fix-health-and-social-care/

[3] National Health Service and Social Care (Commission) Bill 2015-16 (UK Parliament website accessed 10 March 2016), available here: http://services.parliament.uk/bills/2015-16/nationalhealthserviceandsocialcarecommission.html

ENDS

Media Contact

Penrose Care

Robert Stephenson-Padron

robert.padron@penrosecare.co.uk

0207 435 2644

Independent Age

Euan Holloway

Senior Media and PR Manager

020 7605 4286

07701 008248

euan.holloway@independentage.org

Independent Age Pledge Board

National Health and Social Care Commission establishment pledge board including Stephen Dorrell, Norman Lamb, Liz Kendall, and Robert Stephenson-Padron.

Robert Stephenson-Padron with Norman Lamb

Penrose Care Managing Director with former Care Minister Norman Lamb MP at the Houses of Parliament.

Liz Kendall with Robert Stephenson-Padron

Penrose Care managing director Robert Stephenson-Padron with former Shadow Care Minister Liz Kendall MP.

Stephen Dorrell NHS Social Care Commission

Former Health Minister Stephen Dorrell pledges support for Commission into the future of health and social care.

About Penrose Care

Penrose Care is an ethical provider of home care services London, United Kingdom to adults with disabilities and elderly persons, including those with dementia.  The company operates upon a fundamental belief that to promote a caring workforce, the organisation itself must be caring. As the pioneer of ethics in home care in the UK, Penrose Care in 2012 became one of the first four providers in the country to become an Accredited Living Wage Employer and in 2013 the first independent sector provider to be compliant with Citizens UK’s landmark Social Care Charter.

Penrose Care’s ethical approach promotes higher quality social care workers and low staff turnover which in turn results in excellent care. Penrose Care is headquartered in Belsize Village, north London and was founded by Robert Stephenson-Padron, a healthcare research analyst, and Dr. Matthew Knight, a hospital consultant physician.