Tag Archives: Living Wage

Penrose Care raises care worker pay for Living Wage Week

Belsize Village, Hampstead, London – Penrose Care, the UK’s pioneer in the ethical provision of home care, has today announced that the new London Living Wage rate of £10.55/hour announced by Mayor of London Sadiq Khan this morning is effective immediately at Penrose Care for all staff. This is an increase of the prior London Living Wage rate of £10.20/hour and compares to the current national minimum wage rate for persons 25 and above (the mis-named “National Living Wage”) of £7.83/hour.

Robert Stephenson-Padron, managing director of Penrose Care, commented, following the pay increase:

“We are proud to be increasing our care workers’ pay in line with the cost of living in London so that all our colleagues can continue to work and live with dignity. Our ethical framework is essential to ensuring that the home care we deliver is excellent day in and day out. Our Living Wage commitment is the bedrock to other ethical labour practices at Penrose Care such as the payment of travel time between clients, complying with the minimum wage rates for sleep-in shifts, an occupational sickpay scheme, private medical insurance with Vitality Health, and free taxi rides home if ending work after 9pm. I wish all our staff a wonderful Living Wage Week 2018!”

Penrose Care with Living Wage chair and director

Penrose Care’s senior support worker Egle Viskantaite, managing director Robert Stephenson-Padron, Living Wage Foundation chair Stuart Wright of Aviva, Living Wage Foundation director Katherine Chapman and Penrose Care support worker Alica Mikitovičová at the launch of Living Wage Week 2018 at the Barbican Centre, London, UK. November 5, 2018.

Aya Khazaal (Pivoine) and Bob Padron (Penrose Care) with Mayor of London Sadiq Khan

Penrose Care’s managing director Robert Stephenson-Padron with Aya Khazaal of aspiring Living Wage employer Pivoine Nail Spa of Belsize Village and Mayor of London Sadiq Khan at the launch of Living Wage Week 2018 at the Barbican Centre, London, UK. November 5, 2018.

Media Contact

Penrose Care

Robert Stephenson-Padron – Managing Director: robert.padron@penrosecare.co.uk

Landline: 0207 435 2644

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Living Wage Foundation

John Hood – Media Manager: John.Hood@LivingWage.org.uk

Mobile: 07507 173649 Landline 0208 017 2936

About Penrose Care

Penrose Care is an ethical provider of home care services London, United Kingdom to adults with disabilities and elderly persons, including those with dementia.  The company operates upon a fundamental belief that to promote a caring workforce, the organisation itself must be caring. As the pioneer of ethics in home care in the UK, Penrose Care in 2012 became one of the first four providers in the country to become an Accredited Living Wage Employer and in 2013 the first independent sector provider to be compliant with Citizens UK’s landmark Social Care Charter. Penrose Care was named the Living Wage Champion for the London region in 2016 by the Living Wage Foundation and in 2018 received a national Living Wage Champion Award for Industry Leadership.

Penrose Care’s ethical approach promotes higher quality social care workers and low staff turnover which in turn results in excellent care. Penrose Care is headquartered in Belsize Village, north London and was founded by Robert Stephenson-Padron, a healthcare research analyst, and Dr. Matthew Knight, a hospital physician.

About the real Living Wage

The real Living Wage is the only rate calculated according to what people need to make ends meet. It provides a voluntary benchmark for employers that choose to take a stand by ensuring their staff earn a wage that meets the costs and pressures they face in their everyday lives.

The UK Living Wage is currently £9.00 per hour. There is a separate London Living Wage rate of £10.55 per hour to reflect the higher costs of transport, childcare and housing in the capital. These figures are calculated annually by the Resolution Foundation and overseen by the Living Wage Commission, based on the best available evidence on living standards in London and the UK.

The Living Wage Foundation is the organisation at the heart of the movement of businesses, organisations and individuals who campaign for the simple idea that a hard day’s work deserves a fair day’s pay. We recognise and celebrate the leadership shown by responsible employers who voluntarily choose to go further and pay a real Living Wage based on the cost of living, not just the government minimum. There are currently over 4,700 accredited employers.

Penrose Care – Living Wage Champion!

Belsize Village, London, UK: Last night, Penrose Care was announced as a winner of the Living Wage Champion Awards 2018 award for Industry Leadership.

The 2018 Living Wage Champion Awards celebrate individuals and organisations that have made an outstanding contribution to the Living Wage movement, and are proudly sponsored by Aviva, KPMG and the City of London Corporation.

In 2012 Penrose Care became one of the first four Living Wage accredited care homes. In an industry that has often struggled with low pay, Penrose Care used the real Living Wage as the foundation on which to roll out further outstanding labour standards; including guaranteed weekly hours, payment for travel time, private medical insurance and an occupational sick-pay scheme. These standards have set Penrose apart from its peers, and highlighted the possibility of decent pay and conditions within the care sector.

One of three winners of the Industry Leadership Award, including The Haven Wolverhampton and Unlimited Potential, Penrose Care were commended for their promotion of the Living Wage. Other shortlisted organisations included Curzon Cinemas and Creature.

Robert Stephenson-Padron, managing director of Penrose Care, said:

“Since our founding, Penrose Care has been the UK’s pioneer of the ethical provision of home care. The real Living Wage has been the cornerstone of our ethical framework as it is one of the most credible signs to all our stakeholders that Penrose Care is a genuinely caring organisation that respects the dignity of the human person – client, worker, or any other. We are greatly humbled in receiving the Industry Leadership Award from the Living Wage Foundation. The Living Wage Champion Award will further Penrose Care’s confidence in leading a caring organisation which engenders trust and honesty, two of the qualities needed to provide excellent care consistently.”

2018-06-08 (Penrose Care) Receiving Living Wage Champion Award

Robert Stephenson-Padron accepts the 2018 Living Wage Champion Industry Leadership Award on Penrose Care’s behalf. Looking on, Stuart Wright, Chair of the Living Wage Foundation. Alicia Lerche, support worker; and Olga García Gómez, deputy care manager at Penrose Care, and event host.

Olga García Gómez, who started at Penrose Care in 2014 as a support worker and now is a deputy manager, said:

“I am grateful to be part of Penrose Care, a company that takes great care of their staff and clients. The company feels more like a family and whereby you always feel supported due to a variety of ethical working conditions including the London Living Wage, and having available a manager 24/7. In addition to all this, you can develop your professional career at Penrose Care as I have. For someone coming from abroad, all these factors are very important in a job.”

Alicia Lerche, home care support worker; Olga García Gómez, deputy manager; and Robert Stephenson-Padron, managing director of Penrose Care after receiving the 2018 Living Wage Champion award.

Tess Lanning, Director of the Living Wage Foundation, said:

“Congratulations to Penrose Care on becoming a Living Wage Champion award winner. Employers like Penrose Care are leading the way in placing dignity and respect at the heart of their organisation. Over 4,200 employers have now signed up to the movement, and their leadership is making a profound difference to the lives of families and communities across the UK. Penrose Care’s work in celebrating and championing the Living Wage has been vital to its success.”

The Living Wage is an hourly pay rate set independently, updated annually, and calculated according to the basic cost of living. Employers choose to pay the Living Wage on a voluntary basis.

The awards were judged by an independent panel of business and community leaders.

2018-06-08 (Penrose Care) Neil Jameson Bob Padron Alicia Lerche Olga Garcia Kaneez Shaid

Left to right: Neil Jameson CBE, founder and executive director of Citizens UK; Robert Stephenson-Padron, Penrose Care managing director; Alicia Lerche, home care support worker of Penrose Care; Olga García Gómez, deputy manager of Penrose Care; and Dr Kaneez Shaid MBE, Chair of Trustees of Citizens UK at the Living Wage Champion Awards 2018 at Guildhall, London.

Media Contact

John Hood – Media Manager: John.Hood@LivingWage.org.uk

Mobile: 07507 173649 Landline 0208 017 2936

About the real Living Wage

The real Living Wage is the only rate calculated according to what people need to make ends meet. It provides a voluntary benchmark for employers that choose to take a stand by ensuring their staff earn a wage that meets the costs and pressures they face in their everyday lives.

The UK Living Wage is currently £8.75 per hour. There is a separate London Living Wage rate of £10.20 per hour to reflect the higher costs of transport, childcare and housing in the capital. These figures are calculated annually by the Resolution Foundation and overseen by the Living Wage Commission, based on the best available evidence on living standards in London and the UK.

The Living Wage Foundation is the organisation at the heart of the movement of businesses, organisations and individuals who campaign for the simple idea that a hard day’s work deserves a fair day’s pay. We recognise and celebrate the leadership shown by responsible employers who voluntarily choose to go further and pay a real Living Wage based on the cost of living, not just the government minimum. There are currently over 4,200 accredited employers.

What’s the difference between the real Living Wage and the Government’s national living wage?

In April 2016 the government introduced a higher minimum wage rate for all staff over 25 years of age inspired by the Living Wage campaign – even calling it the ‘national living wage’.

However, the government’s ‘national living wage’ is not calculated according to what employees and their families need to live. Instead, it is based on a target to reach 60% of median earnings by 2020. Under current forecasts this means a rise to less than £9 per hour by 2020. For under 25s, the minimum wage rates also take into account affordability for employers.

The real Living Wage rates are higher because they are independently-calculated based on what people need to get by. That’s why the Living Wage Foundation encourages all employers that can afford to do so to ensure their employees earn a wage that meets the costs of living, not just the government minimum.

The judges for the 2018 Living Wage Champion Awards were:

  • Dr Kaneez Shaid MBE, Campaigner and Chair of the Citizens UK Board of Trustees
  • Rosie Gillham, Living Wage employee and campaigner
  • Yvonne Roberts, freelance journalist, writer and broadcaster, The Observer
  • Jane Gratton, Head of Business Environment and Skills Policy at British Chambers of Commerce
  • Matt Sparkes, Head of Corporate Responsibility, Linklaters LLP
  • Tess Lanning, Director of the Living Wage Foundation

About Penrose Care

Penrose Care is an ethical provider of home care services London, United Kingdom to adults with disabilities and elderly persons, including those with dementia.  The company operates upon a fundamental belief that to promote a caring workforce, the organisation itself must be caring. As the pioneer of ethics in home care in the UK, Penrose Care in 2012 became one of the first four providers in the country to become an Accredited Living Wage Employer and in 2013 the first independent sector provider to be compliant with Citizens UK’s landmark Social Care Charter. Penrose Care was named the Living Wage Champion for the London region in 2016 by the Living Wage Foundation.

Penrose Care’s ethical approach promotes higher quality social care workers and low staff turnover which in turn results in excellent care. Penrose Care is headquartered in Belsize Village, north London and was founded by Robert Stephenson-Padron, a healthcare research analyst, and Dr. Matthew Knight, a hospital physician.

2018-06-08 (Penrose Care) Living Wage Champion Family Photo

2018 Living Wage Champions Family Photo.

Penrose Care shortlisted for Living Wage Champion Awards 2018

Living Wage Champion 2018 Shortlisted

London, England, UK – Penrose Care has been shortlisted by the Living Wage Foundation for the Living Wage Champion Awards 2018.

The awards recognise Living Wage employers and individuals that have made great contributions to communities and industries by implementing and celebrating the Living Wage.

Following the announcement which was made on 19 March 2018, today Penrose Care managing director Robert Stephenson-Padron said: “Penrose Care is honoured to be shortlisted for the 2018 Living Wage Champion ‘Industry Leadership Award’ along with other inspiring employers such as Curzon Cinemas. Penrose Care’s innovation in Britain’s home care sector is to be the first comprehensively ethical employer in the vital industry that supports the most vulnerable in our society remain independent in their own homes. Our innovations of the heart and spirit, rooted in respect for the dignity of the human person, have demonstrated that this is the surest way to deliver excellent social care day in and day out.”

Tess Lanning, Director of the Living Wage Foundation, said:

“I would like to offer huge congratulations to Penrose Care on being shortlisted for the Living Wage Champion Awards. By committing to responsible pay, employers like Penrose Care have changed the lives of thousands of people across the UK, lifting workers out of poverty and transforming communities. We look forward to celebrating again in June when we announce the winners.”

The Living Wage is an hourly pay rate set independently, updated annually, and calculated according to the basic cost of living.

Employers choose to pay the Living Wage on a voluntary basis, and almost 4,000 accredited employers have now committed to put respect and dignity at the heart of their organisations by paying the Living Wage.

The awards are judged by an independent panel of business and community leaders, and winners will be announced in June.

Notes to editors

The Living Wage Foundation’s shortlist announcement can be found here

Media Contact

John Hood – Media Manager: John.Hood@LivingWage.org.uk

Mobile: 07507 173649 Landline 0208 017 2936

The Living Wage is an hourly rate set independently and updated annually. The real Living Wage is calculated according to the basic cost of living in the UK. Employers choose to pay this wage on a voluntary basis. The real Living Wage enjoys cross-party support.

The UK Living Wage is currently £8.75 per hour. The London Living Wage is currently £10.20 per hour. This figure covers all boroughs in Greater London. These figures are calculated annually by the Resolution Foundation and overseen by the Living Wage Commission, based on the best available evidence on living standards in London and the UK.

The Living Wage Foundation recognises and celebrates the leadership shown by Living Wage employers across the UK. There are currently over 4,000 accredited employers. We are an initiative of Citizens UK. We believe that a hard day’s work deserves a fair day’s pay. We support responsible employers to voluntarily go further than the government minimum and pay the real Living Wage, to all their staff, so they can earn enough to meet the cost of living.

We receive guidance and advice from the Living Wage Advisory Council. The Foundation is supported by our principal partners: Burberry; GSK; Aviva; IKEA; Joseph Rowntree Foundation; KPMG; Linklaters; Nationwide; Nestle; Resolution Foundation; Oxfam; Trust for London; People’s Health Trust and Queen Mary University of London.

What about the Government’s national living wage?

In July 2015 the Chancellor of the Exchequer announced that the UK Government would introduce a compulsory ‘national living wage’. This new governmentrate is a new minimum wage rate for staff over 25 years old. It was introduced in April 2016 and the current rate is £7.50 per hour, rising to £7.83 in April 2018. The rate is separate to the Living Wage rate calculated by the Living Wage Foundation.  The government rate is based on median earnings while the Living Wage Foundation rate is calculated according to the cost of living.

2016-10-31 (Penrose Care) Living Wage celebration

The modern Living Wage movement provides hope in a cynical age

By Robert Stephenson-Padron

At his 2016 Templeton Prize address, Rabbi Lord Jonathan Sacks warned against dangers simmering in Western societies from the outsourcing of moral responsibility. Lord Rabbi Sacks said:

“Wherever we look, politically, religiously, economically, environmentally, there is insecurity and instability. It is not too much to say that the future of the West and the unique form of freedom it has pioneered for the past four centuries is altogether at risk.” (1)

Indeed, there is an air of cynicism in the West today. I can feel it. I expect you can feel it as well. Fortunately, as in other periods of human history, there is a glimmer of hope that rejects this cynicism: the modern Living Wage movement born out of East London in 2001 by Citizens UK.

2016-05-26 (Penrose Care) Jonathan Sacks and Robert Stephenson-Padron

Penrose Care managing director Robert Stephenson-Padron with Rabbi Lord Jonathan Sacks after he received the 2016 Templeton Prize on May 26, 2016.

The cynicism of the age is fuelled by masking the costs of society’s economic progress

It’s important to first look at the personal attraction to outsourcing moral responsibility since much of the pathologies that appear in society as a whole or in our workplaces specifically start within each one of us. Tribalism and nativism stem from a universal vice – that of a tendency to reject the dignity of “other” human beings out of selfishness. This tendency is amplified with feelings of insecurity.

If you harm an innocent person however, the goodness within you also has a say – you are likely to feel bad about it afterwards. It appears as guilt and that type of stress that keeps you from sleeping well at night. It nags at you, it tells you, “maybe you’re doing wrong.” “Maybe you shouldn’t be doing this.”

We humans don’t like feeling guilty, but we are also aghast to the idea of anyone telling us what to do – and that goes for our inner conscience. Therefore, by dissociating certain human beings from their innate dignity, by reducing them to some category of otherness, we move to a system whereby we may violate the dignity of human beings while minimising our guilt in our progress towards whatever lofty goal we may have: say purely maximising profits or minimising costs without reference to any value system.

With guilt restrained, human selfishness metastasises into an epidemic of exploitation. Polish philosopher Leszek Kolakowski believed that “sensitivity to evil” is indeed “the only system of reference that allows us to contemplate [the] price [paid for ‘progress’] and forces us to ask whether it is exorbitant.” (2) To violate the dignity of another person is evil and by blurring our associated guilt behind different man-made curtains, we lose our sense of evil.

In the UK, we see the results of minimising costs without reference to human dignity starkly demonstrated in the ailing home care sector – where years of Local Councils tendering out home care services for the elderly and disabled persons to the lowest bidders without reference to minimum legal labour standards resulted in a sector of contract winners that widely pay their care workers below the minimum wage, rush them from 15 minute home visit to 15 minute home visit, and call them in and out of work like machines in a warehouse. With home care workers working behind the curtains of these contract holders, Local Councils turned a blind eye to years of labour exploitation.

The case of the UK home care sector has also shown that maximising profits or minimising costs without reference to human dignity is not sustainable. As Herbert Stein’s Law counsels us, “If something cannot go on forever, it will stop.”

In the years following the British tax office’s justified step-up of enforcement of the National Minimum Wage in 2014, three of the UK’s top five operators in the home care sector exited the market. In January 2018, home care workers in Birmingham went on strike over continued austerity of the city’s social care budget which has put enormous strain on the city’s shrunken home care workforce. Events like this, akin to the Memphis (USA) sanitation strikes of 1968 which halted trash collections, remind us that human beings can only be exploited so far. These sudden stops are harmful and they are the direct result of responsible parties outsourcing their responsibilities to others.

Paradoxically, these cases of labour exploitation are under the backdrop of GDP per head in the UK, a broad measure of wealth, being the highest it has ever been in history. Unfortunately, rather than use our growing wealth to adequately address the “costs” associated with this growth, individual actors who are able to address them have widely let these costs spiral out of control into the dire situation we have today. (3) Former American diplomat Ivo Daalder well summarised the paradox of the West’s unprecedented economic growth in 2016:

“Within… global cities… a growing number of people have been left behind. And beyond these cities – out in other parts of the country – more people have lost out on the benefits produced by globalization and accelerating technological innovation. All too many people, in the past fifteen years, have seen their wages stagnate or even cut, their jobs lost, hopes dashed, and dreams deferred.” (4)

With hopes dashed and dreams deferred, we see a rise in people in the West adhering to movements which offer false dreams, which Rabbi Lord Sacks identifies as: “the far right, the far left, religious extremism and aggressive secularism.” (1)

Should we not be surprised that this culture of moral irresponsibility that poisons societies as a whole also poisons workplaces?

Indeed, former PR executive Robert Phillips notes that, “In any organisation, 80% of the workforce is dis-enfranchised and doesn’t care. 25% of the 80% would actively sabotage the organisation for which they work.” (5) If you’re a business leader of an organisation with employee disenchantment to that degree, do you think your organisation is sustainable? I think not.

2018-02-06 (Penrose Care) In the news

In contrast to many of its peers, Penrose Care has been a champion of ethical home care, which it has promoted through various channels, including the national British media.

The real Living Wage accreditation process unmasks hidden exploitation

When I first entered the corporate workforce in 2007, I discovered that the kind security staff, the indispensable cafeteria workers, and phenomenal cleaners I encountered in my workplace all worked for other firms although we all worked under the same “umbrella firm”. I thought at the time, that’s odd. I later learned that this was a common system of outsourcing whereby companies contract out essential internal corporate services, often to the lowest bidder.

If a decision-maker can seemingly outsource the moral responsibility of say, the exploitation of workers on their premises to boost the bottom line, then why not? What if your cleaners and security staff can only get by with third-party assistance, such as in-work benefits; or have to work a second job which means they seldom see their families? Behind the curtain of the contract holders, you may think these are the contract winners’ problems, or more likely, you just may be wholly unaware of the working conditions of these outsourced staff.

As the common reasoning goes: as the manager of the “umbrella firm”, I am responsible for my “employees”. Whereas, what happens to the others – the contractors – that is not my business and you think, not my responsibility. The actual accreditation process of being a real Living Wage Employer however recognises that IT IS your responsibility.

The Living Wage Foundation requires an Accredited Living Wage Employer to roll out the real living wage – £10.20/hour in London currently vs a minimum wage of £7.50/hour for those 25 of age and above – to certain outsourced staff such as cleaners, along with the organisation’s actual employees.

In this way becoming an Accredited Living Wage Employer does something very simple but also very powerful: it reminds you that moral responsibility for the labour standards of those serving your organisation, whether employed or contracted, rest with you. In a culture where the buck stops nowhere, the Living Wage movement reminds you that the buck stops with you.

 

2016-10-31 (Penrose Care) Olga Garcia and Robert Stephenson-Padron

Penrose Care senior care worker Olga Garcia and managing director Robert Stephenson-Padron after Penrose Care being named the London Living Wage Champion 2016 on October 31, 2016.

Celebrating the goodness of the Living Wage promotes the sustainability of those committed to it

By making the courageous moral choice to pay your workers – employed and outsourced – a wage they can live decently from, you are implicitly recognising that all of your colleagues have dignity as human beings. As with finite lives, human beings’ sweat and time is sacred, and thus must be duly respected with fair compensation in return. The young Winston Churchill eloquently recognised this truth in the last century, “It is a serious national evil that any class of His Majesty’s subjects should receive less than a living wage in return for their utmost exertions.” (6)

Realistically, making a moral choice where the cost are high is difficult, hence the need for courage. It means you as a leader need to build and maintain an organisation that is voluntarily taking on a higher cost base than your peers and yet must still be viable and sustainable. For organisations that are not naturally high value-added – such as social care, cleaning, non-luxury retail, and certain manufacturers – and so struggle to afford paying the real Living Wage need a higher quality product/service and associated brand to allow them to charge sufficiently to maintain viability and sustainability.

This is where the Living Wage Foundation, and its celebratory awards such as the Living Wage Champion program, are key. By helping to publicise the good moral choice of your organisation to pay your workers the real Living Wage, the awards help you convey the message of goodness to the public, which will hopefully raise your brand awareness in prospective customers, helping to sustain your Living Wage commitment.

This has been a key recipe for success for my organisation, Penrose Care, which was one of the UK’s first Accredited Living Wage Employers. This view was further confirmed to me in December 2017 when I posed the question to Lee Phillips, finance director of Living Wage-pet food manufacturer Roger Skinner Ltd, “how can a manufacturer in an OECD country maintain ethical labour practices when its cost base is already higher than its international peers?” He told me, “The right ethics, right morals, and you need a brand [to credibly signal this quality]; and look after your customers.”

2017-12-14 (Penrose Care) Robert Stephenson-Padron with Lee Phillips

Penrose Care managing director with Roger Skinner finance director Lee Phillips after discussing the importance of the Living Wage and ethical labour practices for business success on December 14, 2017.

It must be highlighted that being a real Living Wage Employer means your product and service is higher quality. Since neuroscience tells us that good actions tend to release the “feel-good hormone” oxytocin, by adding an ethical component to the purchase of your goods and services for your customers, you have ipso facto boosted the quality of your offering. (7) It should therefore be no surprise that research has indicated that consumers are willing to pay a premium price for goods and services from Accredited Living Wage Employers. (8)

The intrinsic morality of the Living Wage movement stands in contrast to unbridled self-interests

By working as partners with employers, the Living Wage movement builds up workplaces that adhere to moral responsibility, that promote togetherness, that have a common vision that all of us have innate dignity.

Do not underestimate the impact your decisions in the workplace can have on wider society. The great American labour leader Lane Kirkland once said, “history moves when civil society reaches a critical point. It is not decided in the foreign ministries or in the palaces of power but on the streets and in the work places.” (9) By doing a moral good in the workplace, you set a good example for your colleagues to also do good and by boosting their financial security, you reduce the fuel to some of the more macro-level evils we see in the world today. In a cynical world, the Living Wage employer stands as a visible sign that humans can be good. And together, we in the Living Wage movement will continue to make history, tilting it towards goodness and justice, remembering that “It is not hope that gives rise to action so much as action that gives rise to hope.” (10)

Robert Stephenson-Padron is the managing director of home care provider Penrose Care, the winner of the Living Wage Champion award in 2016 for the London region. Penrose Care has been an Accredited Living Wage Employer since 2012.

The foregoing article is the full version of a shorter article written for the web page of the Living Wage Foundation.

2016-10-31 (Penrose Care) Living Wage Champion award

The Living Wage Champion 2016 trophy of Penrose Care.

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(1) Rabbi Lord Jonathan Sacks, “The Dangers of Outsourcing Morality” (www.rabbisacks.org: 27 May 2016), available online here.

(2) Nathan Gardels, “Man does not live by reason alone”, interview with Leszek Kolakowski from 1991 (New Perspectives Quarterly: Fall 2009/Winter 2010), available online here.

(3) Angel Gurría, “Launch of ‘In It Together – Why Less Inequality Benefits All’” (OECD: 21 May 2015), available online here.

(4) Ambassador Ivo Daalder, “The New Demagoguery”, address at the University of Kent (Chicago Council: 13 July 2016), available online here.

(5) Robert Phillips, “Post Truth, Post Trust, Post PR: The crisis of trust is a crisis of leadership”, address at Erasmus University (Jericho Chambers: 20 October 2016), available online.

(6) Donald Hirsch, “How the old idea of the living wage has been embraced by the political establishment” (The Conversation: 6 June 2017), available online here.

(7) Priya Advani, “How Random Acts of Kindness Can Benefit Your Health” (Huffington Post: 11 August 2013), available online here.

(8) Living Wage South Bank Report (South Bank BID: 4 October 2017), page 6, available online here.

(9) Arch Puddington, “How American Unions Helped Solidarity Win” (American Educator: Summer 2005), available online here.

(10) Matthew Taylor, “The idealism of realism” (RSA: 29 June 017), available online here.

Penrose Care Managing Director Robert Stephenson-Padron and senior care worker Nikoletta Makouli following Penrose Care being named the Most Outstanding Home Care Provider in the World.

International recognition for Penrose Care’s ethical labour practices

Belsize Village, London, UK: Penrose Care was honoured Thursday night, November 9, 2017 to receive international recognition for its pioneering work in integrating ethical labour practices into home care at the 2017 Global Over 50s Housing Awards. Penrose Care was recognised as the “The Most Outstanding Homecare Provider in the World.”

Penrose Care Managing Director Robert Stephenson-Padron and senior care worker Nikoletta Makouli following Penrose Care being named the Most Outstanding Home Care Provider in the World.

Penrose Care Managing Director Robert Stephenson-Padron and senior care worker Nikoletta Makouli following Penrose Care being named the Most Outstanding Home Care Provider in the World.

Social care labour practices tend to be poor both in the UK and abroad and Penrose Care has over the years received research delegations from Canada and Japan to learn about Penrose Care’s ethical labour practices, how Penrose Care makes them possible financially, and how it leads to better social care outcomes. Penrose Care has been involved in various labour and social care reports and studies including from the University of Strathclyde (Scotland), Itami City Council (Japan), the Equality & Human Rights Commission (UK) and most recently, The New Policy Institute.

Penrose Care’s ethical workplace practices include paying the London Living Wage, a voluntary wage rate set by the Mayor of London once a year which is meant to be the lowest a person can be paid to still live a decently quality of life in London (currently £10.20/hour vs the mandatory National Living Wage of £7.50/hour); an Occupational Sickpay Scheme that allows workers to receive full pay for up to 10 days a year so workers do not feel compelled to work go to work when sick – supporting public health; free taxis home for workers going home late at night to help ensure their safety and give them that extra boost of relaxation; and a variety of other labour initiatives.

Long-time international labour specialist, Jerald Zellhoefer, a former American social worker and European Representative of the AFL-CIO based in Paris, France and member of the International Labour Organisation from 1991-2010 noted upon learning of Penrose Care’s award, “Penrose Care is a strong supporter of Living Wage which in the social care sector in a country with an aging population is especially important.  Dignity for patients and care givers can never be secondary issues.”

Following receiving the award, Penrose Care managing director said, “The Penrose Care team is once again honoured and humbled to be recognised for our especially caring ethos, which covers both our staff and the vulnerable persons we support to live independently in their homes.”

Mr. Stephenosn-Padron continued: “Penrose Care’s core innovation is an adherence to a timeless truth – that the dignity of man and woman is superior to all other aims. With these guiding values, we have been able to attract and keep special individuals with a vocation to care. And by allowing them to pursue that vocation, we have been able to help the elderly and disabled persons we support live more fulfilling lives.”

Nikoletta Makouli, a senior care worker at Penrose Care who attended the awards ceremony in London at the Courthouse Hotel, said following the award: “We are not only a team because we work together, we are a team because we respect, trust and care about each other. Proud to be part of this company Penrose Care.”

Various other countries were represented at the awards ceremony including organisations from Australia, Canada, India, Italy, Mexico, Thailand and the USA.

With Penrose Care having a multi-year relationship with healthcare researchers from Japan, Penrose Care’s team was especially pleased to meet at the Global Awards ceremony Dr. Hanatsu Nagano who has invented a shoe insole that reduces trips and falls in the elderly.

With Penrose Care having a multi-year relationship with healthcare researchers from Japan, Penrose Care’s team was especially pleased to meet at the Global Awards ceremony Dr. Hanatsu Nagano who has invented a shoe insole that reduces trips and falls in the elderly.

ENDS

Media Contact

Penrose Care

Robert Stephenson-Padron

robert.padron@penrosecare.co.uk

0207 435 2644

About Penrose Care

Penrose Care is an ethical provider of home care services London, United Kingdom to adults with disabilities and elderly persons, including those with dementia.  The company operates upon a fundamental belief that to promote a caring workforce, the organisation itself must be caring. As the pioneer of ethics in home care in the UK, Penrose Care in 2012 became one of the first four providers in the country to become an Accredited Living Wage Employer and in 2013 the first independent sector provider to be compliant with Citizens UK’s landmark Social Care Charter. Penrose Care was named the Living Wage Champion for the London region in 2016 by the Living Wage Foundation.

Penrose Care’s ethical approach promotes higher quality social care workers and low staff turnover which in turn results in excellent care. Penrose Care is headquartered in Belsize Village, north London and was founded by Robert Stephenson-Padron, a healthcare research analyst, and Dr. Matthew Knight, a hospital physician.

About the Global Over 50s Housing Awards

The Global Over 50s Housing Awards (“Global Awards”) are now in their seventh year. They were created to celebrate and reward the best individual and company performances in Seniors Housing/Care Trends, Healthcare Innovation, IT, and Medical Tourism sectors worldwide. The Awards recognise the rapid growth of these sectors worldwide, and the capacity of individuals to influence and set new performance standards across countries, regions and the world. The Awards focus on elevated performance; the creation of new business models; contrarian thinking; recognising and embracing new trends; market leadership; inspirational performance and the elevation of customer experience.

2017-07-04 (Penrose Care) Founding of Penrose Care

Five years on, thank you Dr. Knight

July 4, 2017 marks the birthday of the Penrose Care group of companies. And on this fifth anniversary of Penrose Care’s founding, our co-founder Robert Stephenson-Padron wrote an open thank you letter to our other co-founder, Dr. Matthew Knight.

Dear Dr. Knight,

The Fourth of July not only marks the birthday of my country of birth, the great United States of America, but also another thing very close to my heart: Penrose Ltd, the company you and I founded five years ago on July 4, 2012. Penrose Ltd is the holding company of Penrose Care Ltd, the social care organisation you and I created that is the UK’s pioneer of ethics in home care.

What was it that we did? What did we do that has attracted especially talented people who have vocations to care for the vulnerable in our otherwise “throw away” society? What did we do that has ensured that this group of special people deliver excellent care and support to the elderly and disabled day in and day out since Penrose Care commenced trading in the fall of 2013? What did we do that has caused a small home care provider in north London to attract the attention of health and social care professionals from across the globe?

This is what we did: in a West that has thrown out its roots in the unbridled pursuit of greed, we built a caring organisation that says both in words and in actions to our workers and to those we serve: you have dignity as a human being and this must be respected. This is a guiding truth that surpasses all other inclinations and endeavours. This is what we meant in our founding motto: “home care with a human touch.”

To our workers this recognition of their dignity as human beings first and foremost meant abhorring the idea that workers are a commodity that can be managed via a spreadsheet.

“Labour” is not a production input that you source as cheaply as possible and stack in a warehouse and pull out only when needed.

“Labour” is the sweat and effort of human beings, born from a mother and a father like you and I, who deserve a fair days pay for a fair days work. Penrose Care translated this by becoming one of the first Accredited Living Wage Employers in 2012 amid a social care sector known for poverty wages and sadly, continues to be known for poor working conditions generally. We however, have not and will not be pulled down into the dirty ways of our sector.

“Labour” is the precious time of human beings which must be respected. Penrose Care has translated this by guaranteeing a minimum number of working hours in its contracts the norm amid a social care sector where zero-hour contracts are standard. Although this decision specifically means we cannot grow as quickly as our peers who use people as “just-in-time inventory,” we believe our method builds a more sustainable, resilient and moral organisation. This commitment was enshrined in Citizens UK’s landmark Social Care Charter which also included rolling out an occupational sickpay scheme, something virtually non-existent in home care, to ensure workers do not feel obligated to go to work when ill. To this day, we are as far as we know the only private sector home care provider in the UK to comply with that charter of goodwill.

To our clients, the elderly and disabled, recognition of their dignity as human beings means putting them at the centre of all that we do to ensure the services we provide them are consistently outstanding. It means providing small and consistent teams to help them build trust and to respect their privacy – hence the fundamental necessity of our ethical workplace practices to attract caring people and retain them. It means sending staff who are confident and well-trained so we can help alleviate the stresses of our clients’ daily lives, not add to them. It means knowing those we serve, which is why we comprehensively assess the needs of those we serve and do not provide care visits of less than 1 and a 1/2 hours. It means we recognise the innate value of those we serve even if they are no longer “economically productive”.

As you and I said at the beginning of the Penrose story: to promote a caring workforce the organisation itself must be caring. Over the past five years, we have proven this to be true. And how could it not be true? As you and I simply, although arduously, are providing a living demonstration of the immemorial truth of our species: that every human being is precious. Because they are here, with us, in one human family. And we want to be with our workers, we want to help them live well and to grow. With our clients: we want to be with them.

The honours we have received for our good work in Penrose Care, at home and abroad, have been moving. They have been symbols of a “job well done.” And although we should be proud of our work, I know that you and I will maintain our humility. As you and I both know that we are only doing what we feel is our duty and our obligation to stand up to a culture and a system which is doing wrong, and to fight as hard as we possibly can to do what we know in our hearts to be right.

For the ultimate due, gratitude and praise goes to “The God of Love, The King of Peace,” who in a mysterious way we do not understand inspires us in our mission and in our fight.

My dear Dr. Knight, you and your lovely Spanish wife Elena have become part of my family in my home away from home, the United Kingdom. I am grateful for your friendship and for your collegiality.

We still have much work to do in the years ahead but I am confident we can do it. As Cesar Chavez, the leader of the union movement for which my grandfather belonged to back in California, used to say: “Sí se puede,” Spanish for, “It can be done.”

Thank you.

Yours always,

Bob

Robert “Bob” Stephenson-Padron is the managing director and co-founder of Penrose Care.

2017-07-04 (Penrose Care) Founding of Penrose Care

After months of planning, the firm decision to found Penrose Care happened on June 4, 2012 following a meeting Dr. Matthew Knight and Robert Stephenson-Padron had at the eminent hospital the Clinica Universidad de Navarra in Pamplona, Spain. One month later, Penrose Care was founded.

2017-07-04 (Penrose Care) Media recognition

Over the past five years, Penrose Care’s innovative ethical approach to home care has resulted in the company appearing in numerous mainline media outlet broadcasts.

2017-07-04 (Penrose Care) International recognition

Penrose Care’s approach to delivering consistently excellent care is so unique that research delegations have been sent from abroad to learn from us.

2017-07-04 (Penrose Care) Leadership recognition

Since Penrose Care’s founding, our managing director Robert Stephenson-Padron has twice been named the Most Outstanding Leader in the UK Care Sector.

2016-10-31-penrose-care-living-wage-champion-05-olga-and-bob

In 2016, Penrose Care was chosen out of over 1,000 Accredited Living Wage Employers in the London area to be the Living Wage Champion. To put this into context, in another UK region, IKEA won this honour.

 

Penrose Care supports refugee week

Belsize Village, London – On Tuesday, June 21, 2016, Penrose Care managing director, Robert Stephenson-Padron attended the event “Home from Home” at the Baytree Centre in Brixton, south London. The event shared food, recipes and stories from the centre’s female refugee children celebrating Refugee Week.

With women accounting for 80%+ of the frontline home care workforce, many of whom at risk of labour exploitation, Penrose Care takes a keen interest in women’s rights issues, notably demonstrated by our participating in the UK Commission for Employment and Skill’s Gender Equality Roundtable in March 2015 and our testimony to the House of Commons Women & Equalities Committee in January 2016.

Mr. Stephenson-Padron further said:

“The refugees event held by the Baytree Centre was extraordinarily beautiful and was a testament to the rich contributions refugees and migrants bring to London. As a handful of Living Wage Employers in the London home care sector, Penrose Care hopes that some of the young people at the centre will have the opportunity to aspire to, train and eventually work in health and social care someday. Penrose Care aims to attract the best people to the care sector by offering a reward profession with working conditions that respects workers’ dignity as human beings.”

2016-06-21 Stephenson-Padron Florence Eshamoli Carmen Gonzales

Penrose Care’s Robert Stephenson-Padron with Cllr Florence Eshamoli, London Assembly member for Lambeth and Southwark and Carmen Gonzales of the Baytree Centre.

ENDS

Media Contact

Penrose Care

Robert Stephenson-Padron

robert.padron@penrosecare.co.uk

0207 435 2644

About Penrose Care

Penrose Care is an ethical provider of home care services London, United Kingdom to adults with disabilities and elderly persons, including those with dementia.  The company operates upon a fundamental belief that to promote a caring workforce, the organisation itself must be caring. As the pioneer of ethics in home care in the UK, Penrose Care in 2012 became one of the first four providers in the country to become an Accredited Living Wage Employer and in 2013 the first independent sector provider to be compliant with Citizens UK’s landmark Social Care Charter.

Penrose Care’s ethical approach promotes higher quality social care workers and low staff turnover which in turn results in excellent care. Penrose Care is headquartered in Belsize Village, north London and was founded by Robert Stephenson-Padron, a healthcare research analyst, and Dr. Matthew Knight, a hospital physician.

About the Baytree Centre

The Baytree Centre is a project of the Dawliffe Hall Educational Foundation (DHEF), a Company Limited by Guarantee (Company No. 1450892) and a Registered Charity (Charity No. 278720).

Those who access the Centre face multiple barriers to inclusion, identified by the women and girls themselves as: lack of English language skills; lack of opportunities to learn in culturally appropriate settings; inability to access employment opportunities; poverty; poor housing; isolation; depression; racism and discrimination (including religious discrimination); abusive homes; family breakdown and a lack of family support and structure.

November 2, 2015 (Penrose Care) Robert Stephenson-Padron Boris Johnson Living Wage

Living Wage Week: Penrose Care raises home care worker wages

Living Wage Week: Penrose Care raises home care worker wages

Belsize Village, Hampstead, London, UK: Home care provider Penrose Care has implemented immediately the increase in the London Living Wage rate announced by Mayor of London Boris Johnson Monday morning, November 2, 2015, at Linklaters headquarters in the City of London. The new London Living Wage rate is £9.40hour from £9.15/hour.[1]

Penrose Care managing director, Robert Stephenson-Padron said:

“The Living Wage Foundation’s guidance is to phase in increases in the London Living Wage over six months, but keeping with past practice at the firm – Penrose Care has implemented the increase starting Monday morning. Our hard working care workers deserve no less.”

In October 2012, Penrose Care became one of the first four home care providers in the UK to become an Accredited Living Wage Employer out of then-nearly 6,000 providers. The Living Wage is only part of a wider ethical scheme Penrose Care adheres to called the Social Care Charter of Citizens UK. The charter also includes paying for worker travel time between visits and operating an occupational sick pay scheme.

In comparison, the National Audit Office in March 2014 released a report finding that 160,000 to 220,000 direct care workers in the UK are paid below the national minimum wage “due to deductions for uniforms or due to travel time between visits”.[2] The current national minimum wage is £6.70/hour for persons 21 and over.[3]

Penrose Care managing director, Robert Stephenson-Padron further said:

“Penrose Care continues to be an ethically and responsibly managed organisation, which during these turbulent times in the social care sector, allows us to continue leading the way on home care worker terms in conditions. This ensures we attract top calibre workers and keep them. Penrose Care has found that when we look after our social care workers well, they more than pay us back in the excellent care they provide the vulnerable persons we support every day.”

Penrose Care employees already on a wage rate higher than the London Living Wage will have their pay reviewed this month.

Employers choose to pay the Living Wage on a voluntary basis. The Living Wage enjoys cross party support, with public backing from the Prime Minister and the Leader of the Opposition. Today there are about 2,000 Accredited Living Wage Employers in the UK (2014: 1,000+, 2013: 432), up from 100 in 2012 when Penrose Care first became an Accredited Living Wage Employer.

[1] Mayor announces new London Living Wage of £9.40 per hour (Living Wage Foundation: 2 Nov 2014), available here: http://www.livingwage.org.uk/news/new-london-living-wage-rate-has-been-announced

[2] Adult social care in England: overview (National Audit Office: 13 Mar 2014), pg42, available here: http://www.nao.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/Adult-social-care-in-England-overview.pdf

[3] National minimum wage rates (Gov.UK, accessed 03 Nov 2015), available here: https://www.gov.uk/national-minimum-wage-rates

ENDS

Media Contact

Penrose Care

Robert Stephenson-Padron

robert.padron@penrosecare.co.uk

0207 435 2644

Living Wage Foundation

Emma Kosmin

emma.kosmin@livingwage.org.uk

0207 043 9882

About Penrose Care

Penrose Care is an ethical provider of home care services London, United Kingdom to adults with disabilities and elderly persons, including those with dementia.  The company operates upon a fundamental belief that to promote a caring workforce, the organisation itself must be caring. As the pioneer of ethics in home care in the UK, Penrose Care in 2012 became one of the first four providers in the country to become an Accredited Living Wage Employer and in 2013 the first independent sector provider to be compliant with Citizens UK’s landmark Social Care Charter.

Penrose Care’s ethical approach promotes higher quality social care workers and low staff turnover which in turn results in excellent care. Penrose Care is headquartered in Belsize Village, north London and was founded by Robert Stephenson-Padron, a healthcare research analyst, and Dr. Matthew Knight, a hospital consultant physician.

2015-11-02 (Penrose Care) Boris Johnson Living Wage 2016 announces

Mayor of London Boris Johnson, MP announces the 2015-16 London Living Wage (November 2, 2015 – Linklaters, London, UK)

November 2, 2015  (Penrose Care) Robert Stephenson-Padron Boris Johnson Living Wage

Penrose Care Managing Director Robert Stephenson-Padron with Mayor of London Boris Johnson, MP (November 2, 2015 – Linklaters, London, UK)

Penrose Care M.D. participates in UKCES Gender Equality Roundtable

Belsize Village, London – Earlier today Penrose Care’s managing director, Robert Stephenson-Padron, participated in the UK Commission for Employment and Skills (UKCES) Gender Equality Roundtable panel to help inform the commission on strategies to improve gender equality in the workplace.

Mr. Stephenson-Padron focused on promoting the voluntary adoption of the Living Wage among British businesses as since many low wage jobs are disproportionally staffed by women, Living Wage implementation would have disproportionally positive impact on women.

The panel consisted of 22 people with 4 men, including Mr. Stephenson-Padron and was led by Gail Cartmail, Assistant General Secretary (AGS), Unite the Union.

ENDS

Media Contact

Penrose Care

Robert Stephenson-Padron

robert.padron@penrosecare.co.uk

0207 435 2644

UKCES

info@ukces.org.uk

0207 227 7800

About Penrose Care

Penrose Care is an ethical provider of home care services London, United Kingdom to adults with disabilities and elderly persons, including those with dementia.  The company operates upon a fundamental belief that to promote a caring workforce, the organisation itself must be caring. As the pioneer of ethics in home care in the UK, Penrose Care in 2012 became one of the first four providers in the country to become an Accredited Living Wage Employer and in 2013 the first independent sector provider to be compliant with Citizens UK’s landmark Social Care Charter.

Penrose Care’s ethical approach promotes higher quality social care workers and low staff turnover which in turn results in excellent care. Penrose Care is headquartered in Belsize Village, north London and was founded by Robert Stephenson-Padron, a healthcare research analyst, and Dr. Matthew Knight, a hospital physician.

 

2015-03-31 (Penrose Care) Rober Stephenson-Padron UKCES Gender Equality Roundtable

Penrose Care managing director Robert Stephenson-Padron at UKCES Gender Equality Roundtable (British Library, London, 31 March 2015)

2015-03-31 (Penrose Care) Baroness Margaret Prosser UKCES Gender Equality

Baroness Margaret Prosser speaking at the UKCES Gender Equality Roundtable (British Library, London, 31 March 2015)

Penrose Care head promotes Living Wage in social care at the House of Lords

Belsize Village, London – On March 10, 2015, Penrose Care managing director, Robert Stephenson-Padron, remarked at a Citizens UK / Living Wage Foundation event at the House of Lords on “Promoting the Living Wage in Challenging Sectors.” The event was hosted by Baroness Jan Royall.

“My work at Penrose Care has proven to me that paying the living wage is a credible message to our employees that we care about them as human beings, and I would encourage all employers who can, to pay the Living Wage,” said Mr. Stephenson-Padron, whose full remarks can be found here.

Penrose Care, as the UK’s pioneer of ethics in home care, is persistently committed to promoting ethics in social care which the company has demonstrated leads to high quality care.

ENDS

Media Contact

Penrose Care

Robert Stephenson-Padron

robert.padron@penrosecare.co.uk

0207 435 2644

Citizens UK / Living Wage Foundation

Gillian Owen

gillian.owen@citizensuk.org.uk

07876 246150

About Penrose Care

Penrose Care is an ethical provider of home care services London, United Kingdom to adults with disabilities and elderly persons, including those with dementia.  The company operates upon a fundamental belief that to promote a caring workforce, the organisation itself must be caring. As the pioneer of ethics in home care in the UK, Penrose Care in 2012 became one of the first four providers in the country to become an Accredited Living Wage Employer and in 2013 the first independent sector provider to be compliant with Citizens UK’s landmark Social Care Charter.

Penrose Care’s ethical approach promotes higher quality social care workers and low staff turnover which in turn results in excellent care. Penrose Care is headquartered in Belsize Village, north London and was founded by Robert Stephenson-Padron, a healthcare research analyst, and Dr. Matthew Knight, a hospital physician.

2015-03-10 (Stephenson-Padron, Robert Penrose Care) House of Lords quote photo

Quote photo on Living Wage of Robert Stephenson-Padron from remarks at the House of Lords.

 

2015-03-10 (Penrose Care) Robert Stephenson-Padron speaking House of Lords

Robert Stephenson-Padron speaking about promoting the Living Wage in home care at the House of Lords (March 10, 2015)